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How to cite and reference your information sources

This guide will help staff and students to correctly list the details of where they found their information

We can help you cite and reference your information sources

Referencing wordle by Robyn Collins (original image 450 x 184 pixels)

This Library guide will help you to correctly list the details of where you found your information.  If you use other people's work, words or ideas without this acknowledgement it is seen as cheating. 

This guide is divided into sections by the tabs on the left. Click on a tab to discover more information in that section, for example the APA or Harvard referencing styles.

What is referencing?

There are two parts to acknowledging or giving details about the sources of your information:

 in-text citations with brief details of each information source wherever it is discussed or used in your work

>  a bibliography or reference list with full details of each information source at the end of your assignment or presentation


This 2 minute video by Robert Gordon University Library explains why you add references to your assignments and presentations.

Having trouble viewing this video? Try the YouTube website.

Why do you need to use referencing?

Referencing is a way to show that you have considered information from a range of sources and adds the authority of other people to back up what you say in your assignments and presentations.   

By giving details of your information sources you

  • show it is not just you saying or thinking these ideas or words
  • make it easier for others to track down and confirm the accuracy and credibility of the information sources you have used 

Why is referencing so important?

As a TAFE student you use your research into other people's ideas, work and words on a topic in your assignments and presentations. 

The Student Rights and Responsibilities webpage outlines the responsibility of each TAFE NSW student to do all assessment tasks and examinations honestly without plagiarism, collusion or cheating.

By citing and referencing you give clear and accurate details of all your information sources. This means you acknowledge where you found all the ideas, work and words of other people that you have used in your own work.

There are two parts to acknowledging or giving details about the sources of your information:

 in-text citations with brief details of each information source wherever it is discussed or used in your work

>  a bibliography or reference list with full details of each information source at the end of your assignment or presentation

Referencing styles - APA and Harvard

Referencing wordle by Robyn Collins

The way you include the details of your information sources in your TAFE work is called citing and referencing

There are many different styles you can use to give these details.  At TAFE NSW Riverina, APA and Harvard are the referencing styles most teachers ask their students to use. 

Check with your teachers to find which style you should use.  Use this guide to get Library help with that style.

Get help with APA referencing

APA is an author-date style of citing and referencing information sources.

The APA style has two main parts

  • in-text citation or details of the author and publication date wherever an information source is included in your assignment
  • a detailed reference list or bibliography of information sources at the end of your assignment

 

Our 2 page Library guide for students on How to prepare a reference list or bibliography using the APA style covers 

• why you reference
• how to correctly list your information sources
• in-text referencing

Get help with APA referencing

The Harvard style is also known as author-date referencing.

There are two main parts in the Harvard style

  • in-text citation or details of the author's name and publication date wherever an information source is included in your assignment.  Add page number too whenever you quote specific parts of an information source.
  • a reference list or bibliography which lists full details of all your information sources at the end of your assignment.

 

Our 2 page Library guide for students on How to prepare a reference list or bibliography using the Harvard style covers 

• why you reference
• how to correctly list your information sources
• in-text referencing

Unlock icon by Alexandre Moore used under LGPL licence from https://www.iconfinder.com/icons/2033/security_unlock_icon#size=128

Unlock bibliographies and referencing with this handy tool!

Bibliographies in the Harvard and APA Styles

Get Library help to cite your information sources accurately and in the correct format in your assignments and presentations 

  • for each source ... add in all the details you know on this website 
  • click create citation 
  • view and copy the in-text references and bibliography details

A TAFE NSW Sydney Institute Library service

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Copyright and plagiarism

Copyright law protects the work of authors or creators.  You can only reproduce someone else's work with their permission.

The way an idea is expressed or shared as a work is covered by copyright. What is a work? Examples include a book, magazine article, photo, interview, television program, blog post, computer software, cartoon, letter, tweet, music or dvd.

In your assignments and presentations this means you

  • must cite and reference all works you used to find your information

but

  • may not have permission from the author or creator to copy and include parts of their work in your own work.

This 1 minute video explains that copyright and plagiarism are two different things.

Having trouble viewing the video? Watch it on YouTube.

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